Renovations
Restorations

Learn how to meet present-day needs and yet maintain the charm and architectural integrity.

Guidance Best Practices

MAINTENANCE IS PRESERVATION

The following rationale for maintaining the beauty and historic integrity of the Old North End Neighborhood has been taken from an introduction to the Old North End Neighborhood Interpretive Guide.

“The Old North End Neighborhood is a remarkably intact collection of architecturally and historically significant buildings located within a distinctive setting of mature trees and landscaped medians.  These historic buildings serve as a tangible link to our shared heritage and help make the Old North End a unique place to live and visit.  Because their replacement is impossible, it is important to preserve and protect the buildings and setting that comprise the neighborhood for future generations.”

Since property owners play key roles in such efforts, the information that follows is meant to be educational and help promote good stewardship. 

  • Old North End Neighborhood Interpretive Guide is a pictorial guide to best practices for appropriate maintenance, rehabilitation, additions and new construction to the outside of your home. Some photo examples of what to avoid are also addressed. The two guides below provide support. 
  • Design Guidelines for the North Weber/Wahsatch Historic District –This document was published in 1990 as part of the City’s preservation program. These guidelines contain text, illustrations and photographs that inform both property owners and “public entities” alike.  The intent is to identify historic characteristics, appropriate methods of preservation and to promote architectural cohesiveness.   
  • Preservation Briefs from the National Park Service – Fifty technical briefs provide information on preserving, rehabilitating and restoring historic structures.  Under “The Standards” on that page, the three terms in red above are defined, but information under “Rehabilitation and Guidelines” applies specifically to applications for Colorado tax credits. 
  • Chicago Bungalow Association –This website provides homeowners with how-to seminars.  Especially helpful, are steps to choosing the right landscape design and plants for your bungalow garden.  
    • Additional Historic Preservation Resources in Other PlacesThis section includes how-to resources for many rehabilitation projects and links to other key information.

Renovations
Restorations

Learn how to meet present-day needs and yet maintain the charm and architectural integrity.

General Compliance

Maintenance Is Preservation

If you are planning a construction project for your home, the following pages of information will be helpful and important.  From residential zoning to permits and inspections to variances, the City of Colorado Springs’ Regional Building Department has requirements that provide safeguards and a consistent approach to City codes and standards.  When does a project require a building permit?  When not?    Property owners will find appropriate forms and contact information on the Regional Building Department site.

Building permits:

 After reading an overview on the “Homeowner Process” page and what does and does not require a building permit, click on “Start a Project” to continue.  At the bottom of that page in the dark blue box clicking on “Forms, Handouts & Downloads” will take you to a page with various permit forms, including, if needed, a variance request application.

Variances: 

When is a variance required?  If, according to Regional Building, “existing, nonconforming conditions impede compliance with a City code provision,” you will need a variance.  You may download the Variance Application Form. Contact Regional Building at 719-327-2880 with specific questions regarding your project and if you need to apply for a variance. 

Zoning Code:

The Zoning Code page  on the Colorado Springs website has important zoning information that includes a map and chart that shows setbacks and maximum lot coverage as defined by the various residential zones.   Since every property is within a zone district, click on  SpringsView to find how your property is zoned.